Growing Pains

January 24, 2020 3 min read

1 Comment


One subject I find really interesting is learning some behind-the-scenes of business and marketing. I've written before about how online brands use email subscriptions, discounts, and scarcity tactics to sell and grow. Some elements can be manipulative, but overall, I am just fascinated by how all of these hidden intricacies work.

In e-commerce businesses (retail stores that are all online) like mine, it is common to grow for the sake of growing. More sales, more staff, more products… isn’t that the definition of success?


But, as I’ve peeked a bit behind the scenes, I have wondered, “Are you, with your dozen employees and millions of dollars in sales, making any more profit than the two of us in our home office?” And in many cases, the answer is, I think: no!

Take, for example, custom socks made with your dog's face on them. It sounds random, but this is a popular kind of store to start, because the unique/quirky factor allows for a big mark-up!

I watched a behind-the-scenes video from a brand like this where an 18-year old entrepreneur has a massive warehouse, many employees, and sells a huge amount of custom socks — like, $2million in revenue. But, it turns out that most of their year is spent in virtual (if not actual) debt, waiting for the Christmas sales to pay off all of the salaries & expenses of the year. They also spend ~$30 in advertising costs to acquire every customer.

For us, personally, this business model does not appeal to us for many reasons. More runaround and more pressure. More money that goes to advertisers (acquiring each customer is pricey) and shippers (🤑USPS, FedEx etc.), not the business owner. And, it simply seems like a machine that is running just to run. To get more dog socks into the world. This is not the model for me (or others: the book Company of One outlines the appeal of an alternate route for business). 


EXCEPT THERE'S JUST ONE THING...


With dignify, I actually do want to grow the machine and have more work for the sake of more work. Because we don't employ women to make blankets, we make blankets to employ women: in jobs with dignity, respect, care, and appreciation.

Having now seen the environment firsthand, I know how crucial it is that Basha continues to thrive (and grow!) & to offer this extraordinary workplace to vulnerable women in Bangladesh.

So, how do I grow my own business, dignify, without feeling like I'm simply adding cogs to a big machine... and at the same time scale it up to provide consistent, reliable work for Basha's production?

These are the questions simmering in my mind since leaving Bangladesh. How do I make this work and grow? How can I satisfy my own dreams for self-employment, while inviting others into the fray? What are creative solutions to challenging problems? 

 

The great news is that I do have a few ideas that could be amazing opportunities for growth in a win-win-win kind of way, and you should see them coming out over the next year! But, I am open to your thoughts & creativity, too!

I would love to hear your ideas — please comment below or get in touch via contact@dignify.ca. Thank you for being on this journey with me!


1 Response

Rita Reynolds
Rita Reynolds

January 25, 2020

i believe that if you love what you do and do good and seek direction from the right sources you will be successful.
A couple of comments:My heart breaks for the Rohingya people in Cox’s Bazaar (Bangladesh) What do you think of this situation? Is there any way that these people can be incorporated into the Basha project?
I have an idea for a family member with Autism Spectrum disorder. He has very sensitive skin and loves to wrap himself in a blanket. In fact that is all he wants next to his skin. He likes earth tones. Can you suggest a blanket or blend for him? He is 20 years old January 31.
Thank you.

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