Understanding Our Kantha Blanket Photos



We process through thousands of kantha blankets every year, so of course: it's a lot of work!

It’s a challenge to balance providing accurate, helpful photos of our one-of-a-kind blankets with the necessity of simply getting the photos done! In addition to time constraints, we are also limited by space: our office is not in a large, open loft with a special wall or fresh white paint. [The photos below against the brick wall are of a rental, venue space which we leased for a special photo shoot — not our everyday photo studio/office.]

We do the best we can with what we have, and we feel good about the results. But, if you are having a hard time envisioning what the blanket is like or wish we could have a photo of “the whole thing”, I hope that this deep dive will explain & help!

Read on to look at how we take photos of our classic throws and then large throws. Starting with the classics:

 

Photos of Classic Kantha Throws


 

This is what we would call the “main image” of a classic kantha throw — the thumbnail you would see on a collection page of blankets, and the first image on an individual product page.

      

 

The blanket has been folded to highlight one side (in this case, the paisley pattern with a black border), with the other side also partially visible (the small pattern in red with the edge of squares). It is set against a white background to minimize visual distraction & make the colors really pop.

Here is a glimpse of our "photo studio" (dining room), to give you an idea of where all of these throws are photographed:

 

We also photograph 2 additional images of each side, plus one of the hand-stitched, artisan label. Six photographs in total for every classic throw. 
 


Photos are all taken portrait-style, so one photo (for each side) is trying to capture the full width, edge-to-edge. Of course, the dimensions of the throw do not match up with the photo frame, so we cannot get the whole height of the blanket in the image! The second photo is a close-up to give a better detailed image of the cloth pattern & the stitching.

 


Often, one side of the blanket has a feature end with a different, complementary pattern. The photo usually includes some of that portion in the frame, though we try to mainly feature the majority of the blanket's pattern.

 

We sometimes receive the feedback that it would be nice to see "the whole blanket" in the photos. I completely understand why; without the context of what is beyond the frame on each side, you might feel uncertain about what exactly you're looking at.

I hope that this assures you that, even if it is not exactly the blanket in its entirety, it's as close as can be! 

 

Photos of Large Kantha Throws


 

Large throws are a bit tougher to capture in whole — because of the space of our "photo studio" and the type of camera lens we use.

The photo system is very similar to our classic throws (see above); the difference is that for the large throws, we take two photos per side to try to capture the main pattern & look of the blanket. (Plus, one close-up for detail)

 


Those photos are of the large throw pictured below. Taking a closer look at some of the blankets is worth it — it's not always immediately apparent what colors & beauty are featured on the full throw!